Exeter 20th March from a Friend and Patron

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This topic contains 42 replies, has 11 voices, and was last updated by  marlowe 9 years, 7 months ago. This post has been viewed 2749 times

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  • #6404

    Frank
    Participant

    A friend and patron of Robert is due to sell some significant works, the pre sale tour starts in London with viewings at Gallery 27, London W1, on 11th March moving to The Oakhampton Saleroom on 18th March – The sale is to be held in Exeter on Saturday 20th March.e.g. Lisa Stokes (Holding a Mirror) estimates £40,000 to £60,000

    #10468

    marlowe
    Participant

    So who's the mystery patron?And that'll be OKEhampton for the local bumpkins.

    #10469

    Frank
    Participant

    The sale and invite to the private (and I assume public) viewings is being organised by Bearnes, the invite is in the name of:The Directors of Bearnes Hampton & Littlewood AND The Board of Trustees of the Ben Uri Museum. The Ben Uri are making a bit of a show of it and cashing in as well though, (see below) – None of this features on the TLF web site?11 February 2010 SPECIAL EVENT BOOK NOW: Private View of

    #10470

    WEB WEAVER
    Participant

    The sale catalogue is now available on-line. The collection of paintings belongs to Sam Adair. The catalogue speaks for itself: http://www.bearnes.co.uk/sales/default.aspx

    #10471

    gbl
    Participant

    Wow!! That is a real heavyweight auction (quite a mixed bag of works too)!

    #10472

    Frank
    Participant

    This is a 1.0 to 1.5 Million sale, it will be fascinating to see if the market has the appetite for these prices. Again, the tried and tested approach is being used, create a specialist sale, pack the crowd in and create an environment where bidding 10’s of thousands for works seems ‘normal’, create a feeding frenzy.It’s worth reflecting on some of these items...Rendells%20051014-lot1608.preview.jpg• For sale at Bearns (Westpoint) 2004 (est. £600-£800) sells for £16,000 (Hammer). • For sale at Rendells 2005 (est. £35,000) DNS.• For sale at Bearnes (Exeter) 2010 est. £30,000 to £40,000Forget the fact that it is clearly not what it purports to be in the catalogue for one moment and just contemplate those numbers. Assuming this painting does sell within the range of estimates it would be a x50 increase on estimated value over six years.Does anyone else see a problem here if, say you wanted to re-sell one of these at Sotheby’s or Christie’s in a year or two? Does the West Country know something about the art market that nobody else gets?

    #10473

    gbl
    Participant

    Guide prices are always out of sync with the hammer prices - how does this lead to a future problem? At least this auction is being well promoted at least - if they didn't hype it up, they'd later be accused of doing 'too little' if sales ended up being poor.

    #10474

    marlowe
    Participant

    Assuming this painting does sell within the range of estimates it would be a x50 increase on estimated value over six years.Does anyone else see a problem here if, say you wanted to re-sell one of these at Sotheby’s or Christie’s in a year or two? Does the West Country know something about the art market that nobody else gets?

    Well maybe but do you remember the Self Portrait in the first Westpoint sale, now known as Hospital or Last Self Portrait? Estimated around £3000 but made £35,000 and probably cheap at that, even at Sothebys!

    #10475

    Gypsy
    Participant

    The guy who's collection it is sounded from the auctioners write up a bit of a character.However there seems to be a complete selection of works so he definately knew how to collect his works. My favourite must be the unusual cross shped painting, and I quite like the self portrait where he's sat in thye field.Why are the education and local council paintings set with such a low estimate, they are very well done and look like he spent considerable time doing them, is it just the boring subject matter ?. It seems to me that as soon as its a painting of a "muse" or one of his tramps then that ups the price. Its allmost like the seedier side of life is the more interesting.Which then leads me to the question just what adds value to his art, surely all his projects carry as much thought, and artistic skill. It must be our own perception of his topics and how they stimulate us that eventually puts the actuall value to these works, rather than his skill and or effort.The more I have lookat at his art the more some of the more quirky projects appeal to me, which is why I admire the guy who put this collection together, however why would you sell it, perhaps he has a few saved that are even better.

    #10476

    Frank
    Participant

    I do agree with aspects of the Times piece. The hyped and manipulated monetary value of contemporary art is

    #10477

    marlowe
    Participant

    But then regardless of its merits wasn’t it always going to do well, I mean the last portrait (alleged) of a dead artist, being sold in front of a bunch of relatives, friends, acquaintances, supporters and speculators in a pressurised environment.

    But purchased by a buyer new to Lenkiewicz!

    I suspect there are four or five significant holders, wealthy bidders and market movers for quality Lenkiewicz pieces

    A rather naive view. That's true for most markets.

    #10478

    Gypsy
    Participant

    Ok all this pontification about markets is all well and good but just like on the “Antiques Roadshow” can you guess the value for this sale. Myself I think they have overpriced the paintings. The really good stuff (>30K) will be hard to shift in this current climate of doom and gloom, and pre election jitters.Its quite strange to think that Art is linked to the brass tacks of the economy.I allways think of artists being so distant from the drudgery of normal existance, yet when it comes to selling their work in the higher end of the market,its probably strongly linked to bank bonuses and how much money the city boys have to chuck away on a frivilous whim.I work in the oil industry and my current client Talisman oil here in Norway, buy huge amounts of art as some sort of tax write off, stick it all over the office to brighten the place up then they sell it in a bargain blind raffle at the end of the year.There are some quite well known artists hung on the walls and the staff would be lucky to get one of those. This is repeated throughout 10's of oil companys offices here in Stavanger, making quite a good market for anyone who can slap a bit of paint about and get it into a gallery.But anyway back on track. I will be surprised if mst of those paintings sell on estimate just because of our current economic status.

    #10479

    WEB WEAVER
    Participant

    Myself I think they have overpriced the paintings. The really good stuff (>30K) will be hard to shift in this current climate of doom and gloom, and pre election jitters.I will be surprised if most of those paintings sell on estimate just because of our current economic status.

    These paintings will still be cheaper than those on display at places like Halcyon's Gallery. I've been thinking it over:It's quite a big buzz to be able to buy a really expensive Lenko painting in a Gallery or at an auction. If you own a few paintings already, you probably want to pay a lot for the new painting anyway. It has to be bigger and better than last time, to repeat the initial thrill.

    #10480

    marlowe
    Participant

    Has anyone seen the paintings in London yet? Give us poor locals a report! Out in the sticks I can report that I was at an auction today where a 2 x 2ft painting of Bianca made 17k plus commission. 😮

    #10481

    Annie HillSmith
    Participant

    Where was that? And which painting?Yeah... I was there yesterday [Cork St.];

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