Jojo – what happened?

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This topic contains 24 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  WEB WEAVER 10 years, 7 months ago. This post has been viewed 1877 times

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  • #6370

    member555
    Keymaster

    Amazon informs me:We are sorry to report that the release of the following item has beencancelled:

    #10189

    marlowe
    Participant

    Jojo you were very quick to post to advertise your project, can you now tell us what's happening?

    #10190

    TheWolfman
    Participant

    Jojo you were very quick to post to advertise your project, can you now tell us what's happening?

    Greetings all.I was told a couple of months back by a representative of a reputable local gallery that Jojo's book was unlikely to happen. My guess is he either shot his Lenkiewicz load into his play and lost interest thereafter or more likely support was withdrawn after his theatrical endeavor was unveiled. In my view it is likely that the money men withdrew their support after being duped into investing in, or just simply witnessing Robert's memory being dragged into the mud in such a exploitative way. I believe that any goodwill toward Jojo was lost when what was touted to be a loving tribute to Robert turned out to basically be an abortion of lies, propaganda and frankly boredom. I still wonder whether there was an agenda behind this theatrical bait and switch.Whatever the case I am slightly saddened that the book will not likely see the light of day. The idea certainly sounded fun and perhaps there is a possibility that someone more capable and certainly more responsible might resurrect it one day.

    #10191

    sartre
    Participant

    Jojo would appear to have moved on:- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -http://www.whatsontorbay.co.uk/article.php?id=16349&region_id=6Tuk-Tuk Cabaret in Plymouth (preview)A funny thing happened on the way to the theatre - they added some cabaret and a flavour of Thailand.The result is Tuk-Tuk Cabaret, coming soon to Plymouth's Barbican Theatre’s B-Bar in conjunction with New Street Productions.It’s billed as one of the most outrageous regular theatre

    #10192

    TheWolfman
    Participant

    Jojo would appear to have moved on:

    What, no Hollywood movie of 'The Man in the Red Scarf'? Life can be so unfair.

    #10193

    art3366
    Participant

    Everything has its beauty, but not everyone sees it. Confucius

    #10194

    jojo
    Participant

    Here's Jojo, forgive the fact that it took a while but I had no idea you guys were back in business. I am going to be polite and simply call those people who are once again insulting me, plonkers. Here is my rebuttle to the critisisms above.Firstly the play: The Man in the Redscarf was a great success. It had 80% audiences and everyone who saw it was offered a questionaire. Of those who responded (26% of the total) here is the breakdown:75% thought the play very good, 23% thought it good, 1% thought it average and 1% thought it poor. Whilst one or two narrow minded and abusive members of this forum may call it an abortion the vast majority of people who saw it considered it a full term pregnancy culminating in a happy bouncing boy of a production! The people who sponsored the event also filled out questionaires and all of them, without exception, said that it more than fulfilled their expectations and the majority said they would be happy to sponsor further creative projects given the right economic climate. So whatever mr and mrs misery guts may have thought of the man in the red scarf I was happy. Having said that although I got some really possitive feedback from various theatres including the Royal Court, the script wasn't able to appeal enough in the current climate, so for now that is the end of the play.Next the book: Unlike some of the plonkers who subscribe to this chat room, I am a man of my word. I have said that the book will be published and it will be. I am having regular meetings with the publisher who is working with a design team to make it bigger and bolder than I had imagined it. All this tinkering is taking a frustratingly long time but I am assured it will be worth it in the end. So rest assured the book is on its way and will be a beautiful and informative portrait of Robert by 100 of his sitters and when it goes on sale rest assured there will be enough publicity for you to be aware of it. We are also exploring ways to keep the price affordable, which again is taking time. So PLONKERS it's coming and it and the play will mark the end of my salute to Robert, I believe that together they will amount to a very significant homage and definately a damn sight more impressive than the rather puny exhibition currently occupying a very small room in Plymouth's museum. In 2001 I had an exhibition in there for three months which was more than double the space. I find it laughable that a man of my limitted talents was able to have such a preacence whilst this exhibition of Robert's work is so pittiful.Finally, I am continuing to work within the creative industries, as was meanly pointed out I am embarking on some cabarets which will be more like bizarre theatre happenings, simultaneously I am exhibiting with a couple of other instilation artists in the lobby of the Lavinski building later this year, am likely to be doing a bit more TV presenting work, hopfully starting in the next six weeks and I am about to embark on my next creative project, which again will have the influence of Robert running through it as I seek out all the leaders of religious communities in the city, photograph them and ask them to write up to a page about their God. As an evangelical atheist I am looking forward to this imensely. So there you have it. I hope this clarifies what I'm doing and look forward to all the people who I am sure will now come on line to congratulate me on a great play and share my excitement about the forthcoming book!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Big love to the little (mean plonkers) people.xx

    #10195

    art3366
    Participant

    I am going to be polite and simply call those people who are once again insulting me, plonkers. Here is my rebuttle to the critisisms above.Jojo only one person in this thread (as far as I can see) was negative about you and your work. I think your post is a little over the top to be honest. You should know by now that to use this forum is fraught with danger. I have enormous respect for your endeavours and your work ethic. Some of the things you have done have been outstanding but I was unable to get to see man in a red scarf so I am unable to comment. I think the book about the sitters and paintings is a brillaint idea and I look forward to seeing the reworked format book when it comes out.

    #10196

    TheWolfman
    Participant

    Jojo only one person in this thread (as far as I can see) was negative about you and your work. I think your post is a little over the top to be honest. You should know by now that to use this forum is fraught with danger. I have enormous respect for your endeavours and your work ethic. Some of the things you have done have been outstanding but I was unable to get to see man in a red scarf so I am unable to comment. I think the book about the sitters and paintings is a brillaint idea and I look forward to seeing the reworked format book when it comes out.

    #10197

    marlowe
    Participant

    Here's Jojo, So PLONKERS it's coming and it and the play will mark the end of my salute to Robert, I believe that together they will amount to a very significant homage and definately a damn sight more impressive than the rather puny exhibition currently occupying a very small room in Plymouth's museum. In 2001 I had an exhibition in there for three months which was more than double the space. I find it laughable that a man of my limitted talents was able to have such a preacence whilst this exhibition of Robert's work is so pittiful.

    Have I got this right Jojo? You didn't enjoy seeing at least half a dozen Lenkiewicz masterpieces plus some lovely drawings and watercolours and you think your show of snaps was somehow better because it took up more space?

    #10198

    jojo
    Participant

    No my sweet, you have it wrong. I made the point that my photographs which I considered less important than Robert's work was given a more prominant room and three times the space. Also given the amount of work that Robert produced the exhibition as stood could not be described as anything other than disappointing. A couple of his better known oils and a dozen watercolours is not a fitting exhibition to the artist.

    #10199

    marlowe
    Participant

    No my sweet, you have it wrong. I made the point that my photographs which I considered less important than Robert's work was given a more prominant room and three times the space.A couple of his better known oils and a dozen watercolours is not a fitting exhibition to the artist.

    To the contrary, dearie, you haven't read the script. According to the information at the museum and posted here, the exhibition is not a selection but the entire legacy bequeathed to TLF That's why it's called "Lenkiewicz - the legacy", obvious really. But still you seemed to have missed the point completely.Any fan of Robert's will just relish the chance to see Mouse with wool, Belle and Diogenes, Painter's dead mother, Man watching woman walking away, Paper Crowns. Did you even look at the notebooks in the cabinets? Beautiful and I'd never sen them before. Honestly Jojo I'm not sure you really like Robert's paintings or are interested in them.

    #10200

    jojo
    Participant

    Now ducky, you do surprise me: the entire legacy left to the foundation? How very sad, given the breadth of Robert's work this selection is not very reflective of his output is it? I have to admit I was a bit distracted when viewing the pieces as I was in the company of my four year old son, (who, by the way loved the watercolour: Man eating his own arm) but still, So many fantastic pieces and to be left with so little, what a shame.

    #10201

    TheWolfman
    Participant

    Now ducky, you do surprise me: the entire legacy left to the foundation? How very sad, given the breadth of Robert's work this selection is not very reflective of his output is it? I have to admit I was a bit distracted when viewing the pieces as I was in the company of my four year old son, (who, by the way loved the watercolour: Man eating his own arm) but still, So many fantastic pieces and to be left with so little, what a shame.

    Well, the entire legacy less the six or so works that were removed to preserve the family friendly atmosphere of the museum/art gallery. I agree that the legacy is, all things considered, a terrible shame and that although the notebooks were very important to Robert and to the Foundation they are of little significance to the viewing public at large especially if many of the works they allure to are in private collections elsewhere. Housed in a permanent display at a base of information about Lenkiewicz these works will hold more significance but my gut feeling is that the public would rather see oils and portraits at that.I mentioned in another post that the Foundation should take a leaf out of your book (literally) and ask to 'borrow' works that Robert completed for members of the public. The resultant exhibition would likely cover a far larger area of his working life from the 1970's onwards and be more suited to the tastes of the general population of Plymouth. Perhaps you might consider this yourself for when your book launches?

    #10202

    WEB WEAVER
    Participant

    TLF website says that in addition to the permanent collection: “Key works available for suitable shows can also be obtained from private collectors.”So the Ben Uri exhibition is an example of what TLF can organise by borrowing paintings from these private collections.

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