The physical layout

Home Forums The Library The physical layout

This topic contains 8 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  sartre 12 years, 7 months ago. This post has been viewed 911 times

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #5869

    Site Admin
    Participant

    Jason Semmens has kindly written a ‘walk-through’ description of Lenkiewicz’s library, which can now be found in the ‘About Lenkiewicz>Library’ area of this site.

    As somebody who only ever caught a fleeting glimpse of the books in passing, I found this a fascinating read. Hopefully others will agree.

    Jason, many thanks for putting this article together 😀

    #7294

    sartre
    Participant

    Fascinating! Many thanks to Jason Semmens for making this available.

    #7295

    Francis
    Participant

    Exactly what was required. Informative and educational.

    #7296

    Somerville Gallery
    Participant

    Well Done,this is the tone needed.

    #7297

    Jo
    Participant

    Great article, just the type of information that I, and I’m am sure many others like me, have been waiting for.

    #7298

    freded
    Participant
    Jo wrote:
    Great article, just the type of information that I, and I’m am sure many others like me, have been waiting for.

    Totally agree. The article made great reading and was one of the best posts I've read on this site so far. Keep up the good work.
    #7299

    anna
    Participant

    On the top floor of the main studio, outside the literature room, was the Emily Dickinson cabinet which contained a large number of editions of both ED’s poetry and associated texts. Robert put this collection together to coincide with a small festival held at Plymouth Arts Centre. Bernard Samuels (the Director of PAC at that time) planned the festival as a kind of follow-up to a similar series of events he had organised on Rimbaud which Robert had found very interesting. Robert liked Mr Samuel’s ambitious approach to broadening the intellectual horizons of Plymouthians – he not only staged poetry readings but commissioned composers to put poetry to music, had an exhibition and housed the cabinet of books in the ground floor gallery of the Arts Centre. I think the cabinet is a perfect example of Robert’s particular bibliomania – he was as interested in the collecting as he was in the collection. He spent months tracking down various editions (American and English) of the collected work of Dickinson, the first American newspaper to review the work and two letters (one by Dickinson’s father and the other by Mabel Loomis Todd, the editor of the first two volumes of poems). With the exhibition fast approaching Robert became increasingly frustrated by the scarcity of first editions and I think would have sold his own mother (if she had still been alive!) to get his hands on one so that the collection was completed. Unfortunately, he couldn’t find one, or rather, anyone willing to part with one so he felt the cabinet lacked that certain finesse. By anyone else’s standards it was a unique and remarkable collection. A sad postscript is that the letters and two of the rarest editions were stolen from the cabinet when it came back to the studio – obviously by someone who knew what they were doing.

    #7300

    art3366
    Participant

    not the first valuable books liberated by someone who knew what they were doing.

    #7301

    sartre
    Participant

    Just re-reading Anna's post thanks to art3366's revival of the thread, it strikes me that ROL's collecting mania is not dissimilar to that of the people who want every sales catalogue, every poster, every limited edition print etc etc. Would Robert Lenkiewicz have paid for Emily Dickinson's pen had it come up for sale in the same way as some have bought his palettes?

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.