dutchmaster2

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  • in reply to: TLF – the future – your view. #11212

    dutchmaster2
    Participant
    in reply to: TLF – the future – your view. #11210

    dutchmaster2
    Participant

    Hi Annie,Can you post the link to the Facebook page please.I tried to find it via Google without success and was not sure if I was on the correct page.Just to be sure that would be good of you if you could. 🙂

    in reply to: TLF – the future – your view. #11206

    dutchmaster2
    Participant

    Some issues need to be resolved:1) No one knows about Lenkiewicz (in general) outside of the South West. Taking his work to Germany was a master stroke and if I were the foundation I would try to repeat and capitalise on this by getting the show to an audience which Robert didn't upset (i.e. the whole UK art establishment and the media). The art critics in the UK do not want to know. Get him seen abroad in Basel, Munich, Paris, Berlin, Madrid...Create a buzz...even the USA. Forget the UK market as he won't even get into the tabloids.2) Stop the exhibitions in the South West, no one can get to them, are we all supposed to fly to Bristol or worse Exeter? It's miles away, FACT!!!!! The logical idea would be to get a gallery space in London or convince a major gallery or institution to look at a retrospective of his work, but in a major hub. By the way I've travelled to all the major auctions in Exeter and London just to see the work, so this is from experience!3) Get someone to make an art programme on him. Then it can be loaded to Youtube as well and also shown around the world on terestrial TV stations. Again this needs to be a concise 45 minute programme, it doesn't have to be expensive, shot around the Barbican, a few key note introductions and someone taking the walk through Lenkiewicz's life. It is so interesting it would be hard to condense it down to 45 minutes! But this would showcase the talent and the compex nature of this wonderful artist.These are just 3 things that I came up with, but instead, the foundation are looking at a permanent home for an artist that does not have a following yet?It would be like building an 80,000 seat football stadium for a 3rd division club?Get his name known first and then look at investment.I love this artist since discovering him in late 2000 and have followed this website for years only to be saddened at the lack of interest and his declining popularity, mainly because of all the legal issues early on.It is time to be more aggressive and challenge the art market and the "establishment" to take notice of the work, when a book by Andrew Graham Dixon in Waterstones makes no mention of Lenkiewicz in his 20th century portraits section then you know you are on a hiding to nothing.Hopefully the book in the future would need to be revised. 🙂

    in reply to: Strange posts #11110

    dutchmaster2
    Participant

    I was introduced to Robert's work about a year before his death. Since then it has been a debacle, the difficulties with the estate, the loss of almost all the work through the auctions, the ignorance of the British art establishment and the trend towards "modern" art have not helped Robert's cause. Not to mention the works lost a Chilford Hall.This site used to be a glue for all those interested in his art, binding us together to discuss together, yes argue ALOT together, but at least the discourse was mostly relevant and topical and created a buzz surrounding the artist, his work and life.TLF needed to take that on board and create a similar forum.We all want Robert to be successful, I've never known an artist to have accumulated fans almost like a football team....but that has been the effect.I have been to almost all the sales and when at the first Westpoint sale, I finally saw all of the canvases side by side I was really aghast. Breathtaking.I've seen art all over the world by some of the best artists, luckily I once saw a retrospective of all of Van Gogh's major works in Holland over 12 years ago. Lenkiewicz was in no way overshadowed and would easily hold his own in comparison to any major artist past or present.In terms of British art in the 20th century he has to be held in the same esteem as Hepworth, Freud, Bacon, Hockney, et al. He has made a record for future generations in painting and in his notes.This website was also a key reference for his legacy and needs to be archived a a social document.Let's hope that 2013 is the turning point for the future of his work.Recognition is long over due. 🙂

    in reply to: jojo’s book #10759

    dutchmaster2
    Participant

    Hi Jojo,I've been looking at the website for years and years.And I have to say that there seem to be a lot of people logging on with an agenda or some personal gripe.Don't sink to their level.I never met Robert. Most of us haven't. So for those of us in this epoch and for centuries to come it is important to gather as much information as possible about the artist/subjects...for example, if it wasn't for Van Gogh's letters to Theo how much of the references to that artist's life and work would have been conjectural in its context.I haven't seen your book yet, but by the accounts so far it has received alot of praise. Personally, if Robert would have approved of it or not isn't the point...and if you have made or lost money, again that is not the point, as the book is the most important aspect of the discussion.It's effectively a reference from the sitter, not from Robert's point of view, it allows comparisons and contrasts and ultimately will be viewed in years to come as an interesting insight into the life of the artist.You should be praised for taking the time to contact, photograph and manage a very lengthy and time consuming project.If Robert's work is to finally get the praise it deserves it may just be the Jojo's of the world which get him noticed.Here are a few quotes from individuals who shone brighter in our civilisation than certain members of our forum:---Do what you feel in your heart to be right. You'll be criticized anyway.Eleanor Roosevelt (1884-1962) American columnist, lecturer and humanitarian.---It is much easier to be critical than to be correct.Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881) British politician and author.---If you believe in what you are doing, then let nothing hold you up in your work. Much of the best work of the world has been done against seeming impossibilities. The thing is to get the work done.Dale Carnegie (1888-1955) American writer.---and finally...Those who can -- do. Those who can't -- criticize.Unknown Source---Enjoy your day.

    in reply to: TLF – the future. #10693

    dutchmaster2
    Participant

    Hi fellow readers,This post has thrown up some great debating points.The current position of Robert's work/reputation reminds me of one El Greco.On Wikipedia there was a summation that if you replaced the name El Greco with Lenkiewicz it wouldn't seem out of place:=================Posthumous fame of El GrecoEl Greco - (probably a combination of the Castilian and the Italian language for "The Greek",[α] 1541 – April 7, 1614) was a prominent painter, sculptor and architect of the Spanish Renaissance, whose dramatic and expressionistic style was met with puzzlement by his contemporaries but found appreciation in the 20th century.El Greco was disdained by the immediate generations after his death because his work was opposed in many respects to the principles of the early baroque style which came to the fore near the beginning of the 17th century and soon supplanted the last surviving traits of the 16th century Mannerism.[1] El Greco was deemed incomprehensible and had no important followers.[2] Only his son and a few unknown painters produced weak copies of his works. Late 17th and early 18th century Spanish commentators praised his skill but criticized his antinaturalistic style and his complex iconography. Some of these commentators, such as Acislo Antonio Palomino de Castro y Velasco and Ceán Bermúdez described his mature work as "contemptible", "ridiculous" and "worthy of scorn".[3]The views of Palomino and Bermúdez were frequently repeated in Spanish historiography, adorned with terms such as "strange", "queer", "original", "eccentric" and "odd".[4] The phrase "sunk in eccentricity", often encountered in such texts, in time developed into "madness".====Eccentric....not following the work of his contemporaries, complex themes! Sound familiar?Current generations may not appreciate Robert's work.Maybe because the art critics have already committed themselves to Abstract Expressionism so totally in the 20th C they would be a bit silly to fall back on a portrait painter and laud his work...not going to happen in our lifetime.Eventually the critics of today will be gone and a new generation will be able to look back with fresh insight and be able to finally sort out the childish dross which clutters the nation's galleries from real talent.Shame that most of us will not be around to see that day.Enjoy your day

    in reply to: TLF – the future. #10673

    dutchmaster2
    Participant

    What is the point of trying to promote Robert's work to a wider audience if some basic issues aren't addressed:1) The TLF website only has about 8 images on it - is this a copyright infringement issue?2) There are hardly any major works being displayed in national or regional galleries!3) Although Plymouth played a major part in Robert's life, it means absolutely nothing to the wider audience to be honest, the fixation with housing Robert's works/manuscripts in Plymouth is a blinkered approach. I used to live in Munich which has wonderful art galleries and museums, if the British galleries won't take notice then try abroad. Promote Robert's work elsewhere! PS have you ever tried to get to Plymouth!4) Get an art historian such as Graham-Dixon or Marlowe to present an hour long programme for Channel 4 et al. Surely there is enough material (Art)/scandal (Diogenes corpse)/intrigue (Lovers)/affection (contemporaries) which would contribute to a very interesting and informative programme.5) More exhibitions, OK Bristol in the wake of Banksy may be interesting, the Ben Uri exhibition received a lot of coverage as well....promote promote promote.6) Lastly, robert's ideas. There should be enough material to allow direct quotes from Robert himself instead of interpretations by the TLF and us lot, to try and encapsulate Robert's thoughts and feelings. Ironically van Gogh's life story is referred to, as much through as his letters to his brother Theo as through his art.Robert's legacy of his notes lends itelf to the same sort of interpretation.Robert left a legacy of written work which should be tapped and quoted from, then there is no risk of misunderstanding the issues he wished to pursue through his enquiries.I think that you are all making this too complicated and attacking the TLF for something beyond its control, which to be fair the TLF had it's hands tied for so long. How could it hope to promote Robert's work when they didn't know the exact amount of physical assets which the executor was leaving to them. An impossible job. Give them time to work out a strategy with the assets which they have left and to attain any loan works for future promotion.Enjoy your day 🙂

    in reply to: Exeter 20th March from a Friend and Patron #10498

    dutchmaster2
    Participant

    What was the auction house thinking?It was my understanding that the collection had been shown beforehand in London to attract widespread interest. Although it was busy (i.e. numbers of bodies in the room) there was no "money" in attendance.It was irresponsible from the seller and the auction house to allow such a large collection to be auctioned all at once. No other artist great or otherwise would be allowed to sell in such quantities on purpose, in order to maintain the value of the artist. Artificial, yes, but that's how markets work. Increased supply only reduces the price of the commodity, other artists' work are drip fed into the market to keep the value and the mystique of the artist high. Did the auction house not brief their client before the auction. Was the seller so oblivious to this basic economic principle?And what of any pervious purchasers of Lenkiewicz works.Think of the purchaser(s) of the tempation of St Anthony or the Bishop standing from the last Foundation sale, they must be spitting feathers.On the basis of the amount of works for sale at the auction the timing or location could not have been worse. During a recession, before an election, set in a provincial town.Unfortunately, art these days is centered on the value of the work in terms of capital. Outside viewers may view the auction as a disaster, a high percentage of the works did not sell, those that were of critical value only reached their low estimates. The rest were picked up like crumbs falling from the table, an opportunity for the "Lenkiewicz fans" to pick up a work from their favourite artist at a favourable price.The seller is now in a real pickle. What to do?The remaining works cannot now be sold on at the estimated prices in a hurry. Jim the Boxer was offerd at £17000 with no bidders at all. So what is it's value? Yet Robbie sold for £10000 does that mean that Robbie is on £7000 less expensive than Jim, or £70000 less expensive than the Last Supper?And what of the image/reputation of the artist and ultimately the art work?It's not all about the money. Here is still an outstanding artist, yet to be displayed in a major gallery, still popular, apparently also in London if Bearnes are to be believed from the pre sale hype, but not achieving the heights which we all believe he should be achieving.I think the auction was a miscalculation but a valuable lesson learned.The problem now is how to move on? How does the Foundation go about convincing the great art houses of Britain and Europe/world that the artist has gravity in his work after this theatre show.George Bernard Shaw:

    in reply to: Help with selling Lenkiewicz pieces please #9991

    dutchmaster2
    Participant

    Any chance of seeing some images of the oil paintings in question?That may give us some idea as to the valuation potential of your items.

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